Moritz

Moritz

  • Expert for inno­va­tion processes and crea­tive methods parti­cu­larly for teams
  • Focus on agile processes e.g. Design Thin­king, Scrum, Kanban, etc.
  • More than 15 years of expe­ri­ence as a systemic trained consul­tant and trainer

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Design Thin­king is one of the most popular inno­va­tion methods in the economy. Start-ups do it, concerns explore it and Apple has been using it for the deve­lop­ment of its uniquely successful products and services. But what can design thin­king accom­plish in a company and what are its specific bene­fits? What makes it unique? Must the process be guided or can you do it yourself? Three terms help explain method and success:

  • Team frame­work (People)
  • Process exper­tise (Process)
  • Customer under­stan­ding (Purpose)

Team frame­work – free up your employees

The Design Thin­king method encou­rages crea­tive and solu­tion-oriented opera­tions with 5 to 7-man teams and espe­ci­ally helps hete­ro­ge­neous project teams success­fully develop new solu­tions. Such teams are charac­te­rised by the freedom that they are given by the manage­ment: they can try new things, tumble, get up and carry on in quick succes­sion. This frame­work can unleash the crea­tive poten­tial necessary to develop inno­va­tive products and services that delight the customer and build up compe­ti­tive advan­tages for the company. At the same time, it is fun and helps improve team atmo­s­phere. For such a crea­tive team, diffe­rent, yet comple­men­tary roles should be present. In addi­tion to the obvious inven­tive heads, critical minds are required to coun­ter­ba­lance excess renewal euphoria. Movers and shakers ensure repre­sen­ta­tive results in the end. For this kind of situa­tion, an external observer can be of great help, for example, a suitable role model for the team like Meredith Belbin.

Process exper­tise – because crea­ti­vity needs struc­ture

In addi­tion to crea­ti­vity, design thin­king also means the prac­tice of disci­pline in processes. Above all, a project team is required to focus on results and to get to the point. That’s why every step is time-limited – called ‘time­bo­xing’ in Design Thin­king jargon. No matter how much discus­sion is ongoing and perspec­tives differ: when the given time’s up, one must present. There­fore, a mode­rator who knows the method well and, at the same time, has the expe­ri­ence to lead, moti­vate and chal­lenge the team is required.

Customer under­stan­ding – knowing what the customer wants

Design Thin­king means thin­king along with the customer. Who needs your idea, your product, your service? Who is your customer or consumer? What do they really want or wish for regar­ding func­tions, possible uses or service expe­ri­ences? You’ll find it best to figure it out along­side your customer.

Beware the naïve assump­tion that custo­mers will tell you what they want if you ask for it nicely. That’s why you should make your inno­va­tion percep­tible: construct a proto­type of your product idea that’s tangible, but don’t make it too perfect – create room for feed­back and exchange of ideas. While testing, the customer might suggest impro­ve­ments for further deve­lop­ments of the proto­type. It’s not the initial product idea, that’s important. It only serves as a star­ting point. It’s more important to enthuse the customer with what you finally deliver. It’s not completed until the users are happy and say: “Wow, that’s exactly what I need!” And if they have not, then you’re not finished yet.

Moritz

Moritz

  • Expert for inno­va­tion processes and crea­tive methods parti­cu­larly for teams
  • Focus on agile processes e.g. Design Thin­king, Scrum, Kanban, etc.
  • More than 15 years of expe­ri­ence as a systemic trained consul­tant and trainer

Want to get to know Moritz?

Get in contact

Still curious?
There is more to see here:

All Perspectives