Tobias Kieltsch

  • Tobias Kieltsch is an expert when it comes to e-commerce and logi­stics, always focu­sing on the chal­len­ging last mile. In addi­tion to his work as a consul­tant, Kieltsch is the Chief Opera­ting Officer at adny­mics GmbH. From 2008-2011, he imple­mented the roll-out of the auto­ma­tion packing station at the Deut­sche Post Consult GmbH in southern Germany. This was followed by the further deve­lop­ment of the trans­port sector, speci­fi­cally the service provider control in the courier parcel express envi­ron­ment, called KEP for short, at Sky Deutsch­land GmbH. Since 2008, Kieltsch has supported various projects as a consul­tant and is a welcome guest of discus­sions on e-commerce and the last mile.

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Over break­fast on Saturday morning, we check the weather on our phones: 12 degrees and rain. We’d origi­nally planned to go shop­ping – Benny needs new shows and Sara a new jacket. Then, the Amazon app tells us that kids’clothes are now on sale. No need to leave the break­fast table after all!

With one-click shop­ping, the stuff has been ordered by 09:45 and should arrive in the after­noon. If the stuff doesn’t fit or we find cheaper alter­na­tives, we’ll just send it back on Monday. The week’s shop­ping can also be taken care of online. Quickly, the basic shop­ping list for milk, bread, sausages, and drinks is confirmed for deli­very on Monday.

A push noti­fi­ca­tion informs us that the movie tickets ordered online can be picked up at the box office at 19:30. According to the Google app we should leave by at least 18:45. On the way to the cinema, it occurs to me that tomorrow is Mother’s Day. After quickly orde­ring flowers and a card via app, I wonder: do they deliver on Sundays, too? Regard­less, we arrive at the cinema on time and the show begins. The film is exci­ting – exactly as described in the online review. Because it’s late and still raining, we order a quick taxi through MyTaxi.

On Monday, I’m happy to find that the flower order went off without a hitch. I’m a bit surprised that the o›er for kids’ clot­hing on the Amazon ad only starts on that coming Thursday. As the online radio report on data protec­tion plays in the back­ground, I think about what I can get for my entire collec­tion of reward points at the online super­market.

The story above could be similar for just about any weekend. The buying and selling of goods over the internet is influ­en­cing our daily lives. More and more, we as custo­mers are linking our purchase deci­sions with the accom­panying services around the parti­cular product. Diffe­ring deli­very options – such as deli­very on a desired day and time, or same-day deli­very in an evening time­frame – are just two examples. According to the ZF Future Study 2016 “The Last Mile”, the follo­wing three issues form the foun­da­tion of these changes:

  1. The end customer is the target of all activi­ties on the last mile
  2. The envi­ron­ment – such as the infra­st­ruc­ture, deve­lop­ment, and volume of trac – gives a frame­work for the scope for design
  3. Between the conflic­ting prio­ri­ties of end customer demands and envi­ron­mental limi­ta­tions, inno­va­tion opens up new scope for design

Further services will in the future hold an even more central posi­tion, and shop­ping will be even more a part of our expe­ri­ence. Retrieval of old appli­ances, instal­la­tion directly upon the deli­very of new appli­ances and built–in appli­ances, return of packa­ging and perso­na­lised bonuses in ship­ping are already possible today. The 24/7 deli­very to container freight stations has for many years made the recei­ving and ship­ping of packages to every part of our daily lives possible and demon­strates the scale of inno­va­tion between customer demands and envi­ron­mental limi­ta­tions.

Customer expec­ta­tions – not only in recei­ving goods but also in sending them back (back­wards logi­stics) – are unam­bi­guous: tran­sac­tions have to be fast, simple, and depen­dable. Current deli­very struc­tures have to be appro­priate to the country and region, and new services in the flow process have to be inte­grated and imple­mented. This move­ment in the Courier-Express-Parcel market (CEP) is already in full swing. According to a Forre­ster study, an average growth rate of 11 per cent annu­ally in e-commerce is predicted, and other studies assume even higher rates of growth, with the grea­test growth markets in the UK, Germany, and France, followed by Spain and Italy. Factors of savings, mobile shop­ping access, and a wide range of assort­ments play an important role. Espe­ci­ally in the area of groce­ries and food deli­very, a high demand has been set.

    Demands on logi­stics and IT processes

A central chal­lenge is under­t­an­ding logi­stics services on the last mile within the busi­ness struc­ture and using such under­stan­ding actively through marke­ting and sales. In this project, groups and staff posi­tioned across sectors help in atten­ding to inter­face issues, espe­ci­ally in the imple­men­ta­tion phase. Services should be o›ered even on the landing page in order to demon­strate added value to the customer simply and memo­r­ably. If logi­stics can be under­s­tood as the ribbon tying the process toge­ther, then it should no longer stand in the way of the shop­ping expe­ri­ence.

Many logi­stics services are coupled with real-time inven­tory control. Inte­gra­ting inven­tory trans­par­ently in the query logic is made possible, for example, by click&collect processes or the inte­gra­tion of same-day deli­very options. Depen­ding on the avai­la­bi­lity of goods, a new shop­ping expe­ri­ence can be o›ered to the customer. Here again lies the chance for statio­nary trade – avai­la­bi­lity of products in the imme­diate area of the customer.

The poten­tial to receive goods quickly has by no means been comple­tely exhau­sted. Special groups of goods, which due to their dimen­sions and weight do not fall into the clas­sical CEP busi­ness and require high trans­port costs for the customer, will in the future be even more strongly in demand, with deli­very services at chosen times during the day or evening. Thus, in the construc­tion mate­rials segment, for example, an increase of service avai­la­bi­lity has been reco­gnised and an expan­sion of deli­very options is desi­rable.

The critical customer further­more values ecolo­gical goods and services. Fulfil­ling this expec­ta­tion pres­ents busi­nesses with addi­tional chal­lenges in regard to service vehi­cles on the last mile and systemic timing issues. Effi­cient sche­du­ling of routes, always with regard to possible bund­ling effects, make the last mile scalable and (more) afford­able. E-mobi­lity stands for the current deve­lop­ment in the auto­mo­tive sector. Car makers such as BMW, Daimler, Ford, Volks­wagen, and Peugeot are equip­ping them­selves for the new mobi­lity of tomorrow. E-bikes, e-scoo­ters, and e-service vehi­cles are already being tested and are parti­ally in daily service.

In order to deliver goods quickly to custo­mers, collec­tion points near cities are used. In the cross-docking method (no wareh­ou­sing; quick distri­bu­tion of goods) goods are distri­buted and brought to urban centres. A sensible combi­na­tion of logi­stic move­ments to custo­mers is being analysed by the Nurem­berg Insti­tute of Tech­no­logy. At its core, the rese­arch deals with sustain­able city logi­stics through CEP services within the micro-depot concept. The econo­mical deli­very with load cycles curr­ently on the market attended to among other respects scien­ti­fi­cally. The first promi­sing results confirmed the assump­tion that a coope­ra­tive use of resources through the e-commerce boom has deli­vered sustain­able added value.

“Under certain precon­di­tions in the micro-depot concept a 1:1 repla­ce­ment of conven­tional 3.5t GVM class deli­very vehi­cles by Pedelec load cycles is possible as a conse­quence of the high effi­ci­ency advan­tages of the concept,” says Prof. Bogd­anski, head of the sustain­able busi­ness leadership and logi­stics at the Nurem­berg Insti­tute of Tech­no­logy. “Hence, traffic and ecolo­gical advan­tages resulted in the urban sphere. The proven econo­mics of the concept can further be improved through a coope­ra­tive use of micro-depots, and through fixed cost digres­sion e›ects, sustain­able city logi­stics with load cycles can be possible also for other bran­ches.”

As indi­vi­dual services can be selected, so can they in the future be indi­vi­dually formed into packaged content. The last mile doesn’t end at the customer’s door. Perso­na­lised bonuses will be inte­grated in the deli­very logi­stics by the intro­duc­tion of service-oriented soft­ware and will analyse purchase beha­viour in seconds by commu­ni­ca­ting directly with the customer.

In the future, deli­very robots and drones will be tested and the classic deli­very system will change more and more. No more hurdles stand before a systemic approach to auto­mated deli­very, and it will be exci­ting to see at what tempo the market will develop and which tools and service under­stan­ding our children will be using to order online.

Tobias Kieltsch

  • Tobias Kieltsch is an expert when it comes to e-commerce and logi­stics, always focu­sing on the chal­len­ging last mile. In addi­tion to his work as a consul­tant, Kieltsch is the Chief Opera­ting Officer at adny­mics GmbH. From 2008-2011, he imple­mented the roll-out of the auto­ma­tion packing station at the Deut­sche Post Consult GmbH in southern Germany. This was followed by the further deve­lop­ment of the trans­port sector, speci­fi­cally the service provider control in the courier parcel express envi­ron­ment, called KEP for short, at Sky Deutsch­land GmbH. Since 2008, Kieltsch has supported various projects as a consul­tant and is a welcome guest of discus­sions on e-commerce and the last mile.

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Get in touch

Still curious?
There is more to see here:

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